Your new design will be uploaded in:
...
Please contact Delivery Team on
0113 3200 750 if you have any queries.
X

Drighlington Primary School

Nurturing, supporting, believing, achieving!

Moorland Road, Bradford
West Yorkshire, BD11 1JY

01132853000

info@drighlingtonprimary.org.uk

Headteacher: Mrs Sue Jackson

  1. Our School
  2. Our School
  3. Pupil Premium

Pupil Premium 

Pupil Premium is an allocation of funding provided to schools to support children who may be vulnerable to underachievement, also known as Disadvantaged children. The  Grant includes pupils on the annual census known to have been eligible for free school meals in any of the previous six years, as well as those eligible at the time of the census, such as Looked After or Adopted children. All schools are required to report on the amount of funding and how this is being used. In our school, this grant is most effectively spent on supporting children’s learning in the classroom by providing quality first teaching. In addition to this, funding is spent on curriculum support, targeted intervention, engagement and enrichment activities, pastoral support and social and behavioural intervention. As with all children, to ensure maximum impact the needs of children entitled to the Pupil Premium are clearly identified, steps are taken to meet their individual needs and their progress is closely monitored throughout school. Where small group and individual support is felt to be most beneficial Pupil Premium will be used to support this provision.

Teaching and learning is designed to meet the individual needs of all children. We ensure that appropriate provision is made for children who belong to vulnerable groups and that socially disadvantaged children have their needs adequately assessed and met. We recognise that not all children who receive free school meals will be socially disadvantaged and we also recognise that not all children that are disadvantaged have free school meals. Pupil Premium funding is allocated after a needs analysis to identify priority groups and individuals. The majority of funding is used to ensure that we employ teaching assistants who provide targeted support for pupil premium children. We are always keen to engage with parents and carers to ensure that we have a shared approach to meeting the needs of all children.

In our school, disadvantaged children do not attain as well as all children. They do not attain as well as similar children in similar schools. Currently the gap between disadvantaged and all others in our school is significant but we are working hard to address this.

Addressing Seven Key Barriers through Building Blocks of Success

The DfE document ‘Supporting the Attainment of Disadvantaged Pupils’ evaluates the most effective way to support disadvantaged pupils’ achievement. The document states NFER research found that schools which are more successful in promoting high attainment have a number of things in common. It identified seven building blocks of success. Each of these building blocks is relevant to our school:

1. Whole school ethos of attainment for all

Our target is to ensure that groups of disadvantaged pupils do as well as others. We set an ethos of high attainment for all pupils. We view each pupil as an individual, we value them as individuals and never assume that all disadvantaged pupils face similar barriers or have less potential to succeed. We evaluate the individual barriers for each child, assess their life skills and experiences and determine how these can affect their learning. Through our growth mind-set Superheroes we work to remove barriers of low self-esteem and improve resilience.

2. Addressing behaviour and attendance

We communicate simple, clear rules for behaviour management, understood by all. We promote positive behaviour through rewards such as Dojo points, Superheroes and Timestables Rockstars, all of which are celebrated in family assemblies. We put into place a range of social and emotional support strategies to help pupils in need of additional support, including working with families and external specialists. We have a clear target for attendance, have rapid response systems to address poor attendance and work with families to address any barriers they face in getting their children to school. We promote high attendance through a school-based initiative called Drigopoly.

3. High quality teaching for all

We know that Sutton Trust research has found that good teachers are especially important for pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds. We emphasise the importance of high quality teaching. Through a non-negotiables strategy (our Green Guide) we set high and clear expectations. We monitor performance, address weak teaching and tailor teaching and support to suit individual pupils. Staff also share best practice within our school and within our Cluster schools.

4. Meeting individual learning needs

We see pupils as individuals, each with their own challenges, talents and interests. Through regular assessment and Pupil Progress meetings, staff identify what might help each pupil make the next steps in their learning, whether they are performing below, at, or above expectations. They focus on providing targeted support for under-performing pupils and seek out strategies best suited to addressing individual needs.

5. Deploying staff effectively

We identify the strengths of each member of staff and find the best ways to use them. We aim to spot potential and ‘grow our own staff’. We devolve as much responsibility as possible to support staff and ensure that teachers work with all pupils, including those who need the most support. We aim to ensure that teaching assistants are well trained in supporting pupils’ learning as well as in specific learning interventions, so they can provide effective support to individual pupils or small groups. We also ensure strong teamwork between teachers and support staff.

6. Data driven response to evidence

We use data to identify pupils’ learning needs at every opportunity – when pupils join the school, during regular reviews of progress and during day-to-day teaching. Senior Leaders and Governors rigorously evaluate data and school improvement plans reflect data outcomes. Middle Leaders and teachers engage with the data themselves: they input, analyse and use it to underpin their teaching. We have a consistent marking scheme which recognises pupils’ achievements and sets out the next steps in their learning. Pupils review their feedback and discuss their progress with teachers.

7. Clear, responsive leadership

Our Senior Leaders have accurate knowledge of the school and set high expectations. They have a clear vision for the future of the school. They hold every staff member accountable for pupils’ progress. They ensure that staff understand the barriers, weaknesses and success of the school. Our school is linked to a number of networks such as Cluster Schools, Advisory staff and training networks. Using these links and online research we constantly seek out new ideas, put systems in place and encourage staff to share best practice. Using our "So What?" forms, all our School Leaders and teachers regularly evaluate where we are, what we are doing well, the impact of our work and what needs to be done next. This means that we are an aspiring school that is constantly moving forwards.

What we have done since the last Ofsted inspection and the impact of our work

The Head and Deputy attended conference training, leading to the introduction of new initiatives for identifying wider pupil needs, such as those who have never visited a library. This information has assisted in the process of identifying key pupils who have attended extra-curricular events to support development of the whole child. School has been working with an external auditor, a report has led to the development a Pupil Premium policy and a specific action plan. A new Pupil Premium Champion has been appointed with one day release to focus on raising standards for disadvantaged. A new Pupil Premium Governor has been appointed; the Governor has attended specific LA training. The daily needs of pupil premium children have been mapped alongside SEND children to ensure the school has a full understanding of high needs classes. Additional support in classes has been allocated in response to these findings.

Next steps in line with post Ofsted school improvement plan:

  • Further review of attendance data and approaches to improve lateness and poor attendance
  • Monitor teaching assistant support to ensure they are used effectively to raise standards across the school
  • Implement specific pupil premium action plan; ensure Pupil Premium Governor is engaged in this process
  • Develop specific Pupil Premium Champion action plan
  • Investigate examples of good practice in other schools

How we use our funding

2017-18

The Pupil Premium grant received for 2017-18 is £123,410. The Pupil Premium Plan for 2017-18 can be viewed below. 

click here for pupil premium expenditure plan 2017-18

click here for pupil premium impact statement 2017-18 (note: the grant was later increased to £127,140)

2016-17

The Pupil Premium grant received for 2016-17 is £116,890. The Pupil Premium Plan for 2016-17 can be viewed below.

click here for pupil premium expenditure plan 2016-17

click here for targeted support strategy plan 2016-17

2016-2017 Key Outcomes

Key Stage 2

  • In July 2017 there were 14 pupils in Year 6 that were identified as Pupil Premium.
  • 43% of these Pupil Premium Pupils achieved the expected standard in Reading, Writing and Maths, 2% higher than the Local Authority but 4.2% lower than the National Average.
  • 46.7% of these Pupil Premium Pupils achieved the expected Standard in Reading compared to 55.1% in the Local Authority and 59.8% Nationally.
  • 21% of Pupil Premium Pupils achieved the higher level in reading compared to the National Benchmark of 29%
  • The average score for Reading was 102 compared to the National benchmark of 105.3
  • 50% of these Pupil Premium Pupils achieved the expected Standard in Writing compared to 56.9% in the Local Authority and 65.9% Nationally.
  • 7% of Pupil Premium Pupils achieved the higher level in Writing compared to the National Benchmark of 21%
  • 53.3% of these Pupil Premium Pupils achieved the expected Standard in Maths compared to 58%% in the Local Authority and 63.3% Nationally.
  • 7% of Pupil Premium Pupils achieved the higher level in reading compared to the National Benchmark of 27%
  • The average score for Reading was 101.7 compared to the National benchmark of 105.3
  • The Average Scaled Score for Reading and Maths was 101.9

2015-16

The Pupil Premium grant received for 2015-16 is £120,908. The Pupil Premium Plan for 2015-16 can be viewed below.

click here for pupil premium expenditure plan 2015-16

click here for targeted support strategy plan 2015-16

2015-16 Key Outcomes:      

  • 3/11 children made more than expected progress in all subjects
  • 3/11 children made less than expected progress in one subject.
  • 4/11 children made less than expected progress in all subjects.
  • Most children did not make expected progress in Reading (8/11). 1 child achieved a progress score of above +5.0. 5/11 met the expected standard.
  • 7/11 children made more than expected progress in Writing with 3 children achieving a score of above +5.0. Average progress for this group was affected by the poor progress of 3 children. 7/11 met the expected standard.
  • 5/11 children made more than expected progress in Maths. 1 child achieved a score of above +5.0. Average progress for this group was affected by the poor progress of 3 children. 5/11 met the expected standard.
  • Compared to 2015, the gap to national for the percentage of children achieving the expected standards increased by 9% in Reading to -29%, reduced by 8% in Writing to -21% and increased by 6% in Maths to -29%. The gap remained the same for Reading, Writing, Maths combined (-35%).
  • Between 2013 and 2015, Value Added Scores and Average Point Scores for Disadvantaged pupils increased overall and in all subjects separately.
  • All pupils in all classes benefited from access to additional teaching assistant support as this was a key focus of expenditure.

Outcomes from these Key Stage 2 results informed our school improvement plans for 2016-17.

2014-2015

The Pupil Premium grant received for 2014-15 was £100,100.  The Pupil Premium Plan for 2014-2015 can be viewed below. 

2014-15 Key Outcomes:

The overall average point score (APS) at the end of key stage two SATs was as follows:

  • the APS was 1.1 less than other children in the year group
  • the APS was 0.6 less than the national pupil premium average
  • the school gap has closed by 2.6 points from 2 years ago

Outcomes from these Key Stage 2 results informed our school improvement plans for 2015-16.